use of both the globes, celestiall and terrestriall.

by Hood, Thomas

Publisher: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, Publisher: Da Capo Press in Amsterdam, New York

Written in English
Published: Downloads: 523
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Subjects:

  • Celestial globes -- Early works to 1800.,
  • Globes -- Early works to 1800.

Edition Notes

An exposition of the seven epistles to the seven churches together with a brief discourse of idolatry, with application to the Church of Rome / by Henry More. Big Book Grammar, Year 1 - Teacher's Book, Sue Palmer, Michaela Morgan Book of Pilates The Rocky Monster Show - Script, Malcolm Sircom X Target English: Key Stage 1 - Reading, Sandi Rickerby, Sue Lambert. For both in deeds and words he nourtred was, Both wise and hardie (too hardie alas). In wrestling nimble, and in renning swift, In shooting steddie, and in swimming strong: Well made to strike, to throw, to leape, to lift, And all the sports that shepheards are emong. In euery one he vanquisht euery one, He vanquist all, and vanquisht was of none. And now (with the English of every Latine word added thereunto) brought into a pocket book. Not onely for the ear of the learned, but also that the unlearned may come to the knowledge of both Testaments in the originall tongues [Ressource électronique] / By A.R.

Support Your Local Wizard - Book 3 the Book of Infinite Knowledge, T. J. Ffitch, G. Rockett Robert Johnson's, Thunder The Preservation Manager's Guide to Cost Analysis, Elise Calvi Terra Forma - Global Images The Yardstick, Marie Warder. The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation — Volume 01 by Hakluyt, Richard, - Free ebook download as Text File .txt), PDF File .pdf) or read book . The use of the terms Rome and Roman in Julius Caesar, the early republic and its institutions After the expulsion of the tyrant Tarquin, Livy says in the opening words of Book 2, the acts both in war and peace of the people of Rome are those of a free state, Her breasts like ivory globes circled with blue, A pair of maiden worlds. Intitulé The Globes Celestial and Terrestrial Set Forth in Plano, il fut édité par Sanderson en [7]. La même année, Thomas Hood, un professeur de mathématiques installé à Londres qui avait écrit en sur l'usage des globes célestes [40], publia The Vse of Both the Globes, Celestiall and Terrestriall [41]. Il fut suivi en Décès: juin , Amsterdam.

Hood, Thomas (), The Vse of both the Globes, Celestiall, and Terrestriall most Plainely Deliuered in Forme of a Dialogue. Containing most Pleasant, and Profitable Conclusions for the Mariner, and Generally for all those, that are Addicted to these Kinde of Mathematicall imiento: Junio de , Ámsterdam (Países Bajos). Look for this book on Amazon. Tweet. We have new books nearly every day. If you would like a news letter once a week or once a month fill out this form and we will give you a summary of the books for that week or month by email. They use many other fopperies and superstitions, which I omit, leaving them for other Travellers which shall come from thence hereafter' It is probably to this type of account that Swift is alluding in 'the barbarous Customs and Idolatry of savage people, with which most Writers abound', referred to by Gulliver (Book II, chapter 8, p).

use of both the globes, celestiall and terrestriall. by Hood, Thomas Download PDF EPUB FB2

ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Original t.p. reads: The vse of both the globes, celestiall, and terrestriall, most plainely deliuered in forme of a dialogue, containing most pleasant, and profitable conclusions for the mariner, and generally for all those, that are addicted to these kinde of mathematicall instrumentes.

In the same year, Thomas Hood, a London-based mathematics lecturer who had written a work on the use of celestial globes, published The Vse of Both the Globes, Celestiall and Terrestriall. This was followed in by two works, one of which was Blundeville's tion: Maker of globes, mathematical instruments.

Get this from a library. The vse of both the globes, celestiall, and terrestriall: most plainely deliuered in forme of a dialogue. Containing most pleasant, and profitable conclusions for the mariner, and generally for all those, that are addicted to these kinde of mathematicall instrumentes.

VVritten by T. Hood mathematicall lecturer in the citie of London, sometime fellow of Trinitie. In the same year, Thomas Hood, a London-based mathematics lecturer who had written a work on the use of celestial globes, published The Vse of Both the Globes, Celestiall and Terrestriall.

This was followed in by two works, one of which was Blundeville's : Emery Molyneux, Probably 16th century, Probably. and Use of a Staffe (); W. B., Geographical Playing Cards, with County Maps (); Thomas Hood's The Use of Two Mathematicall Instruments, the Crosse Staffe and the lacobs Staffe (), and The Use of Both the Globes, Celestiall, and Terrestriall (); Leonard Digges's A Book Named Tectonicon (); Ra[du]lph Agas's A.

English globes, for no earlier English globes appear to have been known. 3 Thomas Hood, 'The Use of both the Globes, Celestiall, and Terrestriall, most plainely delivered in forme of a Dialogue' (), sig.

Bir. 3 Sir E. Craster, Geogr.J. () 4 Sir William Sanderson, 'An answer to a scurrilous pamphlet' (), sig. A3V. This. In the same year, Thomas Hood, a London-based mathematics lecturer who had written a work on the use of celestial globes, published The Vse of Both the Globes, Celestiall and Terrestriall.

This was followed in celestiall and terrestriall. book two works, one of which was Blundeville's book. [Thomas] Hood also presented his treatises in such a way that conveniently accessing specific lessons was difficult, if not impossible, for the reader-practitioner.

For example, his book entitled The Vse of Both the Globes, Celestiall and Terrestriall () was roughly two hundred pages long but did not include such helpful tools as an index, a table of contents, or even folio numbers.

In the same year, Thomas Hood, a London-based mathematics lecturer who had written a work on the use of celestial globes, [39] published The Vse of Both the Globes, Celestiall and Terrestriall.

[40] This was followed in by two works, one of which was Blundeville's book. Search Tips. Phrase Searching You can use double quotes to search for a series of words in a particular order.

For example, "World war II" (with quotes) will give more precise results than World war II (without quotes). Wildcard Searching If you want to search for multiple variations of a word, you can substitute a special symbol (called a "wildcard") for one or more letters. The vse of both the globes, celestiall, and terrestriall most plainely deliuered in forme of a dialogue (London: Thomas Dawson) Hutchinson, Roger.

A faithful declaration of Christes holy supper comprehe[n]ded in thre sermo[n]s (London: John Day) Nicolson, Adam. ‘The Use of both the Globes Celestiall and Terrestriall most plainely delivered in forme of a dialogue. Containing most pleasant and profitable conclusions for the Mariner,’ London,8vo.

London: printed for Richard Mount, at the Postern on Tower-Hill, Bib Name / Number:Wing (2nd ed.) / N Copy from: Trinity College (University of Cambridge) Library A tutor to astronomy and geography, or, An easie and speedy way to know the use of both the globes, celestial and terrestial [sic] by Moxon, Joseph, Την ίδια χρονιά ο Τόμας Χουντ, ένας λέκτορας μαθηματικών που είχε τη βάση του στο Λονδίνο και είχε γράψει το ένα έργο πάνω στη χρήση των υδρογείων, δημοσίευσε το The Use of Both.

Or, An easie and speedy way to know the use of both the globes, coelestial and terrestial. by Moxon, Joseph, [London]: Globes, sphers, maps, mathematical projections, books and instruments are made and sold, by Phillip Lea, at the Atlas and Hercules in Cheapside, near the corner of Friday-street, London, In the great terrestriall globe the voyage, as well of Sir F.

Drake as of Mr Th. Candish, is set down and shewed by help of two lines, the one red, and the other blew, whereof the red line doth show what course Sir Francis observed in all his voyage, as well outward as homeward ; and the blew line showeth in like manner the voyage of Master. The trissotetras: or, a most exquisite table for resolving all manner of triangles, whether plaine or sphericall, rectangular or obliquangular, with greater facility, then ever hitherto hath been practised: most necessary for all such as would attaine to the exact knowledge of fortification, dyaling, navigation, surveying, architecture, the art of shadowing, taking of heights, and distances.

This book was published in two volumes, of which this is the second. globes both terrestrial and celestial being still regarded as essential to a navigator’s complete outfit of sailing instruments.

The quick-witted Netherlanders, with well-developed business instincts, engravers. Blundevile, his exercises containing sixe treatises / [by] M. Blundevile. Also Titled. A plaine description of Mercator his two globes, that is to say, of the terrestriall globe and of the celestiall globe and of eyther of them: together with the most necessary uses thereof.

Book; Illustrated English. The concept Astronomy represents the subject, aboutness, idea or notion of resources found in Boston University Libraries. Full text of "The Art Of Navigation In England In Elizabethan And Early Stuart Times ()" See other formats.

The description and use of two arithmetick instruments. 8vo. A learned treatise of globes, both celestiall and terrestriall. from Latin by Edmond Chilmead.

8vo. L'anno dove si ha' perfetto et pieno raguaglio. 4to. Doglioni dealt in this book with the new Gregorian Calendar (introduced in ). Venice 1 W André Tacquet. The Use of the Celestial Globe in Plano, set foorth in two Hemispheres.

London: [by John Windet] for Tobie Cooke. _____. The Use of Both the Globes, Celestiall, and Terrestriall, most plainely delivered in forme of a Dialogue. London: Thomas Dawson. _____. The Use of the Two Mathematicall Instruments, the Crosse Staff. Chapter I INTRODUCTORY SURVEY.

Much has been written about the Copernican theory of the universe and its importance in the history of science. Almost every discussion of the literature of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries has likewise had occasion to note its significance in the history of ideas and its influence on some of the outstanding writers of the period.

Full text of "The voyages and works of John Davis, the navigator" See other formats. For instance, Hood, Thomas ended his The use of both the globes, celestiall, and terrestriall (see ref. ), by saying that “if you shall stand in need of my helpe, either through forgetfulnes or hardnes of that, which I have taught, you, if you will repaire to my poore lodging in Abchurch lane, you shall find me ready to doe you what Cited by: As also the bold and stout answers of an ambassadour of Privernum, in the senate of Rome, when the Privernates were in the same low condition, in which the Kings party now is.

All for the present use of the Members of both Houses. / By P.D. Burges, Cornelius. / []. Wherefore to use them both we will be bold. Thus lists me fondly with fond folk to toy, And answer fools with equall foolerie.

8 || The meaner mind works with more nicetie, As spiders wont to weave their idle web, But braver spirits do all things gallantly. Of lesser failings nought at all affred: So Natures carelesse pencill dipt in light.

When both replenisht with celestiall light, All coming evils could foresee and flie; When both with clearest eye, and perfect sight Could every natures difference descrie: Whose pictures now they scarcely see with pain, Obscure and dark, like to those shadows vain, Which thinne and emptie glide along Avernus plain.

The Second Part of Philosophy, Physick, or, of Nature The Second Part of Philosophy -– Physick, or, of Nature Sect. 1 – Of the Universe, or the Nature of Things Chap 1 – That the Universe Consists.

A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the : Mario Biagioli.But upon further consideration, how much it would increase the Book both in bulk and price, and consequently make it of less publick use than I did intend it; I laid by those thoughts, and resied satisfied with the adding of four Maps for the four parts of the World: by which the Reader may discern how each Countrie lies unto the other, though.Drayton was not the first to use the term Ode for a lyrical poem, in English: Soothern inand Daniel in had preceded him; but he was the first to give the name popularity in England, and to lift the kind as Ronsard had lifted it in France; and till the time of Cowper no other English poet showed mastery of the short, staccato measure.