Venetians in Constantinople

nation, identity, and coexistence in the early modern Mediterranean by Eric R. Dursteler

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press in Baltimore, MD

Written in English
Published: Pages: 289 Downloads: 55
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"This book is a very important study, which gives invaluable insights into the cosmopolitan culture and the human condition in early modern Ottoman Constantinople, a growing metropolis in the Mediterranean during a time of enormous change. And most important, Dursteler's findings invite one to think that perhaps the Ottoman Empire in the early 5/5(1). Venetians in Constantinople: nation, identity, and coexistence in the early modern Mediterranean. Responsibility Eric R. Dursteler. the Venetian merchant and diplomatic community in Muslim Constantinople. While factors such as religion, culture, and political status could be integral elements in constructions of self and community. Venetians and Ottomans in the early modern Mediterranean. To prove this point, Dursteler fo‐ cuses on the Venetian merchant and diplomatic community in Ottoman Constantinople from to , when the Ottoman and Venetian empires experienced the longest period of uninterrupted peace. Dursteler develops his argument in six chap‐ ters. Go to Chapter One Section • Go to Book World's Review. Constantinople City of the World's Desire By Philip Mansel Commerce had passed into the hands of Venetians and Genoese. The.

  Constantinople was renowned for its merchants and markets from the 5th to the 10th centuries. The city attracted in large numbers foreigners who came to buy and sell in its bustling markets especially from the ninth century when Byzantine trade with its neighbours was at its zenith. Today we can only imagine the sound of. Dursteler, Eric R. Venetians in Constantinople: Nation, Identity, and Coexistence in the Early Modern Mediterranean. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, Howard, Deborah. Venice & the East: The Impact of the Islamic World on Venetian Architecture, – New Haven: Yale University Press, This revised and expanded edition of The Fourth Crusade gives fresh emphasis to events in Byzantium and the Byzantine response to the actions of the Crusaders. Included in this edition is a chapter on the sack of Constantinople and the election of 4/5(3). The Byzantine aristocracy failed to compete with the Genoese and the Venetians, who oversaw increasingly profitable trade routes. Moreover, Constantinople was one of the first cities to lose many of its citizens to the Black Death in In the fourth to fifth centuries, the population is estimated to have been between , and 1,,

The Venetian Quarter of Constantinople from to Topographical Considerations. Add to My Bookmarks Export citation. Type Chapter Author(s) D. Jacoby Page start Page end Is part of Book Title Novum millennium: studies in Byzantine history and culture dedicated to Paul Speck Author(s) Claudia Sode, Sarolta A. Takács, Paul.   Constantinople: The Last Great Siege by Roger Crowley (pp, Faber, £) The Siege of Venice by Jonathan Keates (pp, Chatto & Windus, £20). Cities are entering a new golden age. Like.

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Venetians in Constantinople. Nation, Identity, and Coexistence in the Early Modern Mediterranean. Eric R Dursteler. Historian Eric R Dursteler reconsiders identity in the early modern world to illuminate Veneto-Ottoman cultural interaction and coexistence, challenging the model of hostile relations and suggesting instead a more complex.

Venetians in Constantinople book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Historian Eric R Dursteler reconsiders identity in the e /5.

The Byzantine–Venetian War of was fought between the Byzantine Empire and the Republic of Venice as a result of the Byzantine imprisonment of Venetian merchants and citizens across the Empire.

10, Venetians were imprisoned in the Byzantine Venetians in Constantinople book, Constantinople, e Doge Michiel's apparent will to pursue a peaceful solution, outrage in Venice Result: Decisive Byzantine victory.

Venetians in Constantinople shows how, on the whole, they got over religious differences as, on their side, the Ottomans also did: it is interesting to see how if they stayed for any length of time the traders (as also those of the English Levant Company) made Turkish friends, which did not happen to the same extent in, say, Morocco.

At the. Buy This Book in Print summary Historian Eric R Dursteler reconsiders identity in the early modern world to illuminate Veneto-Ottoman cultural interaction and coexistence, challenging the model of hostile relations and suggesting instead a more complex understanding of the intersection of by: Home > Venetians in Constantinople > Reviews "This book is a very important study, which gives invaluable insights into the cosmopolitan culture and the human condition in early modern Ottoman Constantinople, a growing metropolis in the Mediterranean during a time of enormous change.

And most important, Dursteler's findings invite one to. Venetians in Constantinople: Nation, Identity, and Coexistence in the Early Modern Mediterranean (The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science) - Kindle edition by Dursteler, Eric R.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Venetians in 5/5(1). Venetians in Constantinople: Nation, Identity, and Coexistence in the Early Modern Mediterranean (The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science) [Dursteler, Eric] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Venetians in Constantinople: Nation, Identity, and Coexistence in the Early Modern Mediterranean (The Cited by: Historian Eric R Dursteler reconsiders identity in the early modern world to illuminate Veneto-Ottoman cultural interaction and coexistence, challenging the model of hostile relations and suggesting instead a more complex understanding of the intersection of cultures.

Although dissonance and strife were certainly part of this relationship, he argues, coexistence and. 1. The Venetian Nation in Constantinople 2.

The Merchants of Venice 3. The Unoffcial Nation: Banditi, Schiavi, Greci 4. Jews, Renegades, and Early Modern Identity 5. Merchants, Patricians, Citizens, and Early Modern Identity 6. An Urban Middle Ground: Venetians and Ottomans in Constantinople Notes Glossary Works Cited IndexPrice: $ Free Online Library: Venetians in Constantinople: Nation, Identity, and Coexistence in the Early Modern Mediterranean.(Book review) by "Renaissance Quarterly"; Humanities, general Literature, writing, book reviews Books Book reviews.

The book's strength is that it offers entertaining vignettes of a number of colorful Venetians, including painters, writers, and luminaries such as Marco Polo as well as Sofia Baffo, first concubine of Ottoman emperor Murad III, and Francesco Lupazolli, the Venetian consul at Smyrna in the mids, whose chief claim to fame seems to have been 4/4(2).

Venetians in Constantinople: nation, identity, and coexistence in the early modern Mediterranean. Similar Items. Venetians in Constantinople nation, identity, and coexistence in the early modern Mediterranean / by: Dursteler, Eric.

Published: () The early churches of Constantinople: architecture and liturgy by: Mathews, Thomas F. Published: () ; Constantinople in the early eighth century: the Parastaseis syntomoi chronikai: introduction, translation, and commentary.

Fall of Constantinople, ( ), conquest of Constantinople by Sultan Mehmed II of the Ottoman dwindling Byzantine Empire came to an end when the Ottomans breached Constantinople’s ancient land wall after besieging the city for 55 days.

Mehmed surrounded Constantinople from land and sea while employing cannon to maintain a constant barrage of. Venetians in Constantinople: Nation, Identity, and Coexistence in the Early Modern Mediterranean (The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science) Eric R Dursteler.

Historian Eric R Dursteler reconsiders identity in the early modern world to illuminate Veneto-Ottoman cultural interaction and coexistence, challenging the.

Identify the location where Christians began to organize the crusade against Constantinople. VENICE Inenraged citizens of Constantinople.

Get this from a library. Venetians in Constantinople: nation, identity, and coexistence in the early modern Mediterranean. [Eric Dursteler] -- "Historian Eric R.

Dursteler reconsiders identity in the early modern world to illuminate Veneto-Ottoman cultural interaction and co-existence, challenging the model of hostile relations and. The Venetians Though the secondary name says it all, this is a view of the 1, year Republic of Venice seen through the lives of some of its most glorious sons and daughters.

Its a different style history and Paul Strathern makes it work to perfection/5. A Byzantine traitor, however, opened the sea-gates to the enemy.

The host of crusaders and Venetians slipped into the city, storming it on Ap For three days, the crusaders and Venetians looted and burned the ancient capital of the Eastern Christian world. Constantinople held the masterpieces of the ancient world.

It was said that the total amount looted from Constantinople was aboutsilver marks. The Venetians receivedsilver marks that was their due, while the crusaders recei silver marks.

A furthersilver marks were divided evenly up. The crusaders unable to pay the Venetians. Robert de Clari: La Prise de Constantinople, xi and xii, in Hopf: Chroniques Gréco-Romanes, pp.

Old French. While the pilgrims were staying on the island of St. Nicholas the doge of Venice and the Venetians went to speak to them and demanded the pay for the navy which had been prepared.

This book traces the diplomatic, cultural and commercial links between Constantinople and Venice from the foundation of the Venetian republic to the fall of the Byzantine Empire. It aims to show how, especially after the Fourth Crusade inthe Venetians came to dominate first the Genoese and thereafter the whole Byzantine by: Constantinople had been an imperial capital since its consecration in under Roman Emperor Constantine the the following eleven centuries, the city had been besieged many times but was captured only once: during the Fourth Crusade in [34] The crusaders established an unstable Latin state in and around Constantinople while the remaining empire splintered.

Dursteler gives 3 illustrations to the character of the peaceful relations between Venetians and Ottoman in the early modern Constantinople. What are they. page Why be so Friendly. Venetians in Constantinople Geography Constantinople page "City of Infidels" "City of the.

The World Economy website helps the public learn about the world's economy. Aimed at teachers, researchers and students of economics and economic history. Discover facts from Maddison's book via an interactive map and samples from: The World Economy: A Millennial Perspective which covers the development of the world economy over the last years.

The Venetians also gained extensive trading privileges in the Byzantine Empire during the 12th century, and their ships often provided the Empire with a navy. Ina vicious anti-Western riot broke out in Constantinople targeting Latins, and Venetians in l: Eraclea, (–), Malamocco.

After the siege. Following the end of the first siege of Constantinople inon 1 Augustthe pro-Crusader Alexios Angelos was crowned Emperor Alexios IV of the Byzantine Empire, who then tried to stabilize the city.

But riots between anti-Crusader Greeks and pro-Crusader Latins broke out later that month and lasted until November, during which most of Location: Constantinople, Byzantine Empire. PDF | OnJosé Olábarri and others published Book Review about identity in Constantinople and Venice in the 16th Century | Find, read and cite all.

Venetians domains and the Ottoman Empire between the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. Medal with portrait of Sultan Mehmed II designed by Gentile Bellini, Istanbul,Venice, Galleria Giorgio Franchetti alla Cà d'Oro.

Venetian ambassadors in Damascus, Istanbul,Venice, Galleria Giorgio Franchetti alla Ca dOro. 3. The crusaders unable to pay the Venetians.

Robert de Clari: La Prise de Constantinople, xi and xii, in Hopf: Chroniques Gréco-Romanes, pp. Old French. XI. While the pilgrims were staying on the island of St. Nicholas the doge of Venice and the Venetians went to speak to them and demanded the pay for the navy which had been prepared.This was ultimately shortsighted, as it allowed the Venetians to dominate trade in the region while cutting Constantinople out of much of the lucrative business.The Venetians were governed in Constantinople by a podestà and council who, with the leading barons, formed the emperor's council.

The Venetians' power to veto imperial actions was reinforced by their near-monopoly of commerce and their control of the only fleet that could provide naval support for the Latin : Naz Baydar.